Best Power Drills 2021 – Buyer’s Guide

Boring holes, driving screws, stirring mortar — these are some of the many tasks that a power drill can perform. If you pick the right model, it’ll enable you to carry out various DIY projects without having to resort to the “brute force” approach! 

In this post, we’re presenting seven of the best power drills on the market. How powerful are they? What accessories come along? And what factors do you need to consider before purchasing? Let’s find out!

The Best Power Drills – Our Top Picks

IMAGE PRODUCT DETAILS
  • Batteries: two 1.5 Ah
  • No-load speed (low/high): 400/1500 RPM
  • Impact rate (low/high): 6400/24000 BPM
  • Torque: 42 Nm
  • Drilling capacity: 35 mm in wood, 13mm in steel/masonry
  • Weight: 1.5 kg
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  • Batteries: two 1.5 Ah
  • No-load speed (low/high): 500/1800 RPM
  • Impact rate (low/high): 6500/23400 BPM
  • Torque: 50 Nm
  • Drilling capacity: 38 mm in wood, 13 mm in steel/masonry
  • Weight: 3 kg
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  • Battery: 0.8 Ah
  • No-load speed (high): 650 RPM
  • Torque: N/A
  • Drilling capacity: 20 mm in wood, 8 mm in metal
  • Weight: 1 kg
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Best Power Drills

Blue Ridge BR2808K2 Cordless Hammer Drill

Our favourite power drill is the Blue Ridge BR2808K2 drill. With its impressive 21 torque settings, this drill is geared toward professionals who must perfect their fastening accuracy.

Although this is a professional level drill, it is more than suitable for beginners and DIYers. We found this cordless drill to be sturdy, yet lightweight. The performance is as good as the high-end models.

To provide the best value for customers, Blue Ridge ships the following accessories: two 1.5 Ah batteries, 1-hour fast charger, a robust carrying case, and a total of 43 bits that suit different tasks. And don’t worry, these extras don’t fatten up the price tag — it actually comes at almost half the price of other high-end models, such as the Dewalt DCD776C1.

If you are looking for the best power drill for the money, we would recommend the Blue Ridge BR2808K2 without any hesitation.

Specifications

  • Batteries: two 1.5 Ah
  • No-load speed (low/high): 400/1500 RPM
  • Impact rate (low/high): 6400/24000 BPM
  • Torque: 42 Nm
  • Drilling capacity: 35 mm in wood, 13mm in steel/masonry
  • Weight: 1.5 kg

We like

  • Intricate torque adjustability
  • Lightweight
  • Comes with 43 bits and a carrying case
  • Come with two batteries

We dislike

  • For once, nothing to say!

Final Verdict

This Blue Ridge cordless drill offers the best value for the money. In addition to the lavish accessories, it also comes with a 2-year warranty, proving that Blue Ridge is confident about its build quality.

Ryobi R18PD3-215GZ 18 V ONE+ Cordless Combi Drill

With a maximum torque of 50 Nm, the Ryobi R18PD3-215GZ beats all of the other power drills we reviewed in terms of efficiency and ease-of-use.

Because such a robust performance will devour a lot of power, Ryobi sends two 1.5Ah batteries with the drill. This way, you can work with one and leave the other standing by for sudden outages. 

With the battery installed, this drill weighs about 3 kgs. While this isn’t really unwieldy, it can affect the manoeuvrability to a moderate extent. Then again, that’s the inevitable cost of getting a strong tool. 

On the downside, Ryobi doesn’t ship any free accessories with this drill — there’s no carrying case or drill bits. But to be fair, you can’t really expect such perks at its affordable price.

Specifications

  • Batteries: two 1.5 Ah
  • No-load speed (low/high): 500/1800 RPM
  • Impact rate (low/high): 6500/23400 BPM
  • Torque: 50 Nm
  • Drilling capacity: 38 mm in wood, 13 mm in steel/masonry
  • Weight: 3 kg

We like

  • High value for the money
  • Premium build quality
  • Comes with two batteries
  • Features powerful LED light

We dislike

  • Weighs a bit more than the average

Final Verdict

If you’re searching for a brawny drill to bore holes in masonry, the Ryobi R18PD3-215GZ should be your best bet.

Terratek FUT18V01-3 Cordless Drill Driver

Although Terratek markets the FUT18V01-3 as a combi drill, it doesn’t sport a hammer-action feature, which makes it fall into the “drill driver” category. Is that bad? Not necessarily. 

The absence of the hammer-action feature means that you can’t use this drill to bore holes into masonry. However, you can still drill into wood and metal with a pretty efficient performance. 

With the performance out of the picture, the ultra-affordable price becomes the most distinctive feature of this drill. If you do the math, you’ll find that Terratek charges more than half the price of high-end models. 

We only wish if Terratek could send a bigger battery with this drill — the 0.8Ah capacity might restrict the amount of work you have to do before pausing for a recharging session.

Specifications

  • Battery: 0.8 Ah
  • No-load speed (high): 650 RPM
  • Torque: N/A
  • Drilling capacity: 20 mm in wood, 8 mm in metal
  • Weight: 1 kg

We like

  • Budget-friendly
  • Lightweight build
  • Comes with 13 accessory pieces

We dislike

  • No hammer-action feature

Final Verdict

The Terratek FUT18V01-3 is powerful enough for driving screws and drilling holes into wood and metal, but it’d be too weak for masonry.

Bosch 06039C8171 Universal Impact 18 Cordless Combi Drill

The Bosch UniversalImpact 18 can only provide 30 Nm of torque, which is considerably weaker than the Blue Ridge BR2808K2. But does that mean it’s useless? No. This drill would be powerful enough for general DIY work, even if you have to bore holes in masonry. 

Despite its low power, this drill comes with two batteries, allowing customers to use it non-stop. And because it weighs only 1.3 kg (with the batteries installed), you can use it for hours without worrying about straining your wrists. 

Unfortunately, Bosch doesn’t ship any free drill bits with the package. As a result, the overall cost might amount to a sizable sum at the end. 

Specifications

  • Batteries: two 1.5 Ah
  • No-load speed (low/high): 400/1350 RPM
  • Impact rate (low/high): N/A
  • Torque: 30 Nm
  • Drilling capacity: 30 mm in wood, 10mm in steel/masonry
  • Weight: 1.3 kg

We like

  • Comes with two batteries
  • Lightweight yet robust build
  • Ergonomic design

We dislike

  • Expensive

Final Verdict

With its intermediate power, this drill is best suited for infrequent DIYers. It’s a bit pricey, but we think the top-notch Bosch quality is well worth it.

Einhell 4513861 Cordless Impact Drill Driver

Einhell is one of the most renowned German power tool manufacturers, notorious for excellent build quality and unrivalled performance. The 4513861 drill can deliver up to 60 Nm of torque with a speed of 1800 RPM, making it ideal for undertaking both professional and DIY tasks. 

As you might already know, using this drill at full capacity will incur considerable vibration rate. The good news is, Einhell installed a secondary handle at the side to relieve some stress off of your joints. 

Unlike most high-end models, this drill weighs 1.7 kg only, making for satisfying manoeuvrability in action. 

To meet the high performance demand, Einhell provides two 2.0Ah batteries with this drill. Better yet, it also ships a fast charger that will save even more time.

Specifications

  • Batteries: Two 2.0Ah
  • No-load speed (low/high): 500/1800 RPM
  • Impact rate (low/high): 8000/28800 BPM
  • Torque: 60 Nm
  • Drilling capacity: N/A
  • Weight: 1.7 kg

We like

  • Features a secondary handle for better stability
  • Comes with two batteries
  • Lightweight build

We dislike

  • A bit expensive

Final Verdict

The Einhell 4513861 is a drill you can depend on if you’re constantly taking on demanding DIY projects.

Black & Decker BCD700S1K-GB Cordless Combi Drill

If you’re searching for a drill that can take on occasional DIY projects, the Black & Decker BCD700S1K-GB should be good enough. With a maximum of 21000 beats per minute, you’ll be able to drill large holes into masonry, although it might be a bit slower than expected.

Since it’s mainly intended for home use, it features only ten torque settings. And again, this doesn’t make it a horrible tool, but you’ll need to be careful not to overdrive your screws. 

On the positive side, this drill comes with a 1.5Ah battery, which should be large enough for lengthy home projects. 

Specifications

  • Battery: 1.5 Ah
  • No-load speed (high): 1400 RPM
  • Impact rate (high): 21000 BPM
  • Torque: 40 Nm
  • Drilling capacity: 25mm in wood, 10mm in steel/masonry
  • Weight: 2.2 kg

We like

  • Economical price tag
  • Lightweight
  • Comes with a carrying case

We dislike

  • Doesn’t feature an LED light

Final Verdict

Although this drill won’t suit a professional worker, it’ll be ideal for a recreational DIYer, especially because of its budget-friendly price tag.

Dewalt DCD776C1 18V Cordless Combi Drill

Needless to say, Dewalt is second to none in terms of build quality and durability. Although the DCD776C1 isn’t its most powerful product, it didn’t fail to amaze us.

The thing we appreciated most about this drill is the XR battery. Even though it’s rated at 1.3 Ah, it can actually provide up to 33% more capacity, according to Dewalt

Upon testing, we also loved the ultra-sensitive trigger featured in this drill, which allowed for excellent speed control without the annoying choppiness that we usually notice in other brands.

With a torque of 42 Nm, this drill will be able to handle challenging materials with relative ease. However, we didn’t like that it only features 15 torque settings — it’s not a crucial flaw, but it might slightly affect the screwdriving precision, especially when working with delicate materials.

Specifications

  • Battery: 1.3 Ah
  • No-load speed (low/high): 450/1500 RPM
  • Impact rate (low/high): 7650/25500 BPM
  • Torque: 42 Nm
  • Drilling capacity: N/A
  • Weight: 1.3 kg

We like

  • Sturdy build
  • Ergonomic handle
  • Generous battery capacity
  • Comes with a heavy-duty carrying case

We dislike

  • Price

Final Verdict

Although it’s pricey, we recommend the Dewalt DCD776C1 for people who want to invest in a quality product.

Power Drill Buying Guide

Here are the things you need to consider before buying a power drill.

Drill Type

Brands categorize drills according to their use into three main types: drill drivers, hammer drills, and combination drills. 

Drill Drivers 

Drill drivers are the most basic type of power drills. You can use them for drilling holes into wood and metal, in addition to driving screws.

Owing to their modest motors, these drills will struggle considerably in tough materials, such as concrete. Then again, their affordable cost makes them highly valuable for recreational DIYers. 

Hammer Drills

As the name suggests, hammer drills add a powerful pounding motion to the typical rotation of the normal drill. Such a hefty force will enable you to drill easier through concrete and masonry, making them more useful for a broader range of jobs. 

Since these drills are bound to produce tons of vibration, they’re usually equipped with double handles, so that you can stabilize them with two hands. 

Combination Drills

Combination drills, or “combi drills” for short, combine the previous drill types into an efficient, 3-in-1 tool. 

They have a basic drill mode, which generates enough force to drill through wood and metal without shredding them. And they also incorporate a hammer-action feature to suit challenging materials. Last but not least, you can use them to drive screws with adjustable torque. 

Needless to say, this type provides the best value for the money.

Corded vs Cordless Power Drills

Although corded drills have lighter builds and virtually unlimited working duration, we don’t really recommend them. 

Unlike other power tools, drills are required pretty much everywhere around your home. Say you want to adjust your rain gutter, bolt the outdoor furniture down to the patio, or drill holes into the fence to make a vertical garden — all of these jobs would be tedious ordeals with corded drills. 

Voltage and Amperage

The voltage rating is the main factor that determines the range of jobs a drill can efficiently perform. Tools ranging from 4 to 8 volts are generally weak, but they would be ideal for light drilling. Ratings between 12 and 18 volts are the go-to options for most DIYers. Lastly, ratings up to 24 volts are the brawniest models meant for frequent, heavy-duty work. 

On the other hand, amperage denotes battery capacity. These ratings are measured in amps per hour (Ah), and they range between 1.5 to 4 Ah. As you might’ve guessed, the larger the number, the longer the battery will last. 

Torque vs Speed

Toque denotes the force exerted by the bit on the drilled material, while the speed merely describes the bit rotation speed. 

When drilling through softwood, you should increase the speed and dial down the torque to yield smooth cuts. On the contrary, masonry requires the maximum torque possible to effectively break the material, while the speed should be moderate to avoid spreading drill dust

Search for a Brushless Motor

As the name suggests, drills featuring brushless motors operate without physical brushes. Because this design generates less friction and heat, it excels in terms of durability.

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